Nov 052016
 

This post contains affiliate links.  I received a copy of this book for review.

At times, it feels like we are the only ones in our community willing to stand up, offering help to children who may be in unsafe situations.

At other times, it feels like we are not doing anything; we have become comfortable in our own little family.

Neither of those feelings accurately reflect real life.  One is a very self-centered, know it all, martyr mentality that dismisses all the ways others are aiding families around us.  The other comes from our normal not being ‘normal’ any more, we are used to some of the adjustments we have made to help our kids feel safe.

While neither are accurate, both come from the same place – the feeling of being overwhelmed at all that is wrong in this world.  No one person can do it all.

Make It Zero: the movement to safeguard every child by Mary Frances Bowley dives into this issue, looking not only at the obvious dangers children may face – hunger, abuse, and trafficking; but also poverty and isolation, exploring real examples of each.  Not only are they talked about, but each chapter ends with a ‘React’ section, encouraging the reader to do something about what was just read.

Make It Zero was not about children only.  It actually began by talking about adults, parents, and teenagers, not exactly who one thinks of when talking about the children in our society.  However, by the end of the second chapter I was starting to understand.  Safeguarding the children means giving them a good foundation.  That foundation is the parent/s in their lives.  If the parent is struggling, the children will struggle.

One example is that of poverty.  If there is lack of money in the home, then the parents might have to work longer hours, resulting in not being around to raise the children safely.  The kids are more likely to make bad choices, miss out on emotional milestones, and become adults who are lacking in one area or another, who then become parents themselves.

…even a giant Redwood tree starts out as a seed…

What can we do?  Social reforms have been taking place for hundreds of years, trying to remove all poverty and hunger from our world, yet it is still around.  Child trafficking seems to only be getting worse at a time when it should be easy to keep track of people.

Isolation was one of the issues that touched me the most.  You would think having a small world, not being disturbed by others would not be such a bad thing.  But how about the child left alone for hours at home, with no one to help keep them safe or teach them how to interact with others?  Or the foster teen who ages out of the system with no support network, expected to figure it out on their own at the mature age of 18?  Or the single parent household, where all the responsibility for the family and home falls on one person?  These are all situations that lead to problems much bigger than where they began.

Wellspring Living, Hire Hope, and other programs grew out of a desire to address these issues, to help the children by helping the family address underlying issues. Realizing the solution was not a simple 3 step answer, many people came together to address the needs leading to  This aspect, working to keep the family together by giving them the resources and support they needed, was one of my favorite parts of this book.  Instead of compounding the problem by saying all children should be removed from these homes, though at times it might be needed, the reader is given ideas, links, books, and other materials to help them learn to look around their community and find ways to help.

look im helping children cutting with scissors

I came away from reading Make It Zero feeling encouraged.  Yes, there are many issues out in the world, and no one person can solve them all.  However, we can all do something right where we are.  For now, that something is going to look different than it did 5 years ago, and will look different than it will 5 years from now.  This does not mean we are doing nothing, it a different type of something.

Our kids have a heart for others.  As much as they may add liveliness to my day, they are constantly asking if we can help someone else out.  They want to give all of our food to the school during food drives, they do not understand why we do not give money to every person on every street corner who is asking for it, and they are ready to hop on a plan to help those affected by natural disasters.  This is something my husband and I wish to encourage and direct.  We try to make them aware of the needs around us, finding tangible ways for them to help.  Make It Zero has given me several ideas of ways to help, as well as having opened my eyes to issues I did not know existed.

If you would like to learn more about this movement, I would encourage you to also checkout Make It Zero‘s website.

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