Produce Auctions In Ohio – A sampling of 10 various auctions found across the state

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Apr 252015
 

produce auction collage

This post in part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

Ohio produce growers and those in search of produce, have several choices of produce auctions to attend.  Rural Action has a map of 9 different produce auctions across Ohio.  There is a new auction (Scioto Valley Produce Auction) that is not on Rural Action’s map, bringing the total to 10 different produce auctions. While the majority are found in the northeast part of the state, there are several found in the southern part as well as on auction in the northwest part of the state.


Chesterhill Produce Auction, in Morgan County is located at 8380 Wagoner Rd, Chesterhill, Ohio, is a example of having the right people in the right place at the right time to fill a need of a community.  The video here explains how and why this auction was started.  They also highlight the benefits to the community and the farmers. Starting in May, on Mondays and Thursdays at 4 p.m, the auction will continue into October.

On a side note, I was really thrilled to see the effort and results put into this auction by those who first thought of idea and those who have joined to make it a success.  It would have been easy to give up and throw in the towel any  number of times along the way.  Instead, perseverance has paid off and now there is a thriving auction in place that benefits all involved.

Here are two more links about the auction in Chesterville :

Chesterhill Produce Auction: A Rural Appalachia Case Study

Chesterhill Produce Auction from Rural Action

 

Bainbridge Produce Auction in Ross County is located 5 miles south of Bainbridge, Ohio 45612 on St. Route 41.  This is in the southwest portion of Ohio, about 1.5 hours east of Cincinnati.  Auctions are held 3 times a week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  For further information call 740-634-3451.

 


Owl Creek Produce Auction, in Marrow County, is located at 20999 Waterford Rd. (St. Rt. 22) Fredricktown, Ohio 43019.  The 2015 Season began in early April.  In May the auctions move to taking place on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Fridays at 9 a.m.  From June through the beginning of October auctions take place 3 times a week.  Check out their website for times.

Ohio’s Country Journal wrote an article in 2014 highlighting the Owl Creek Produce Auction.

Scioto Valley Produce Auction in Hardin County if a fairly new auction, locate a few miles east of Kenton Ohio.  This auction is fairly new, having started in 2011. The auction is located at 18031 State Route 309, Kenton, Ohio 43326.  

The first auction of the 2015 Season was April 17th.  Check their Facebook page for more information on upcoming auction dates and times.

Here is another video featuring the Scioto Valley Produce Auction.

 

Captina Produce Auction is located at  39050 W. Captina Highway, Barnesville, Ohio in Belmont County.  Auctions are held on Tuesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m.  Here is an article from written by the Barnesville-Enterprise that tells a bit more about this auction and what you might find.

 

Mt. Hope Produce Auction in Holmes County is located at 7701 St. Rt. 241 Millersburg, Ohio 44654

From their website: “The Farmer’s Produce Auction was started in 1995 as a wholesale market for local farmers to grow and sell their produce in bulk to buyers throughout the state. The Produce Auction was the first of its kind started in Ohio and is currently one of the largest in the state.”

Looking at their auction schedule, I would have to agree.  They currently are running produce auctions twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays), though say they will be “running Monday @ 11:00 AM, Tuesday, Thursday, and Fridays at 10:00 AM.”  

Here are some further articles, experiences and photos from the Mt. Hope Produce Auction:

Homerville Produce Auction is found in Medina County.  Their address is 9430 Spencer Rd. Homerville, Ohio 44235

To see when their next auction is, check out their Facebook page.

 

Middlefield Produce Auction/Geauge Growers Produce Auction, in Geauge County, is a very action packed  place to be.  Found at 14575 Madison Rd. (St.Rt. 528) Middlefield, Ohio 44062, this auction can have up to 3 different auction rings going at the same time by the high of summer.  Even through the winter they are selling items, though no produce.

The first auction for the 2015 Season was April 6th. Through the month of April Monday auctions are held 5 p.m.  Begining May 1st, 10 a.m. Friday auctions will also be held.  In June, the 10 a.m. Wednesday auctions will be added.

Here is an article from Cleveland.com concerning the Middlefield Produce Auction – Monday Is Auction Day In Middlefield.

Blooming Grove Auction, located at 1091 Free Rd. Shiloh, Ohio 44878 is in Richland County.  To find time of auctions, check here.  A phone number can also be found at the same link, if you are wanting to double check whether an auction is take place at a certain time.

Oct 102012
 

Here are some ebooks I found at various places on the web.  Before downloading the books, please double check the price to make sure it has not changed.  I tried to share only those that seemed to be from reputable websites.  If you experience any issues, please let me know.

There is no common topic among these, except that they all pertain to gardening.

1. USAGardener.com released the ebook “Guide to Growing Your Favorite Vegetables”

http://usagardener.com/free-gardening-ebook.php

2. Sustainable Gardening Tips has two free ebook about how to control garter snakes and snails.  Unfortunately their delivery system is down at that moment.  I did want to mention it though, in case anyone was interested in bookmarking the site.

http://www.sustainable-gardening-tips.com/free-garden-ebooks.html

3.  On Wit Guides you are able to download a copy of The American Gardener, printed in the late 1800’s.  First, there is a review of the book.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, on the left side, there is a button that says, “Download Ebook”.  Click there.  It will download as a zip file.

http://www.witguides.com/details.asp?id=294

4. Doug’s Green Garden has a book compiled by responses from readers in regards to the question, “What was the best advice they would give to a new beginning gardener?”.

http://www.douggreensgarden.com/free-gardening-ebook.html

5. I have followed through with the link below, but have not downloaded the books. There is a link for The Gardener’s Seceret Handbook ebook, as well as plans for several different projects you may want: potting bench, hoop house, etc.  The website come across as a bit promotional to me.  That may not be a bad thing, but it is something I wanted you to be aware of.  I’m not endorsing the sight; just giving you the link so you can see if it is something you might be interested in.

http://www.freeplants.com/

6. Free Ebooks Canada has a copy of Gardening Secrets For A Lush Garden available.  Several of the topics are geared more towards our northern gardening friends, whether in Canada or elsewhere.

http://free-ebooks-canada.com/?p=1002

The also have a book about Garden Troubleshooting here.

http://free-ebooks-canada.com/?p=5144

7. If crafts are something you are interested in, you might check out the ebook from Fave Crafts.

http://www.favecraftsblog.com/free-garden-crafts-ebook/

May 242012
 

This was the scene in my basement at the start of March, two and a half months ago.  An abundance of individual soil packs.  No seedlings yet sprouted.  It actually looked vary bare.  Even more so when I turned on the grow lights.

This was the view on my back deck Friday.  Green.  Beautiful green sprouts.

 

This includes the handful of vegetable and bedding plants that were headed for the street side stand.  They had been transferred into a bit bigger pots a few days earlier and had acclimated well.  There were a few losses, but that was to be expected.  So far this year the survival rate  has been much, much better than years past.  Not quite sure what it is that I did differently.  I was very happy with the results this year though.  Perhaps I’m just getting a better feel for things – the amount of watering, light, when to put outside, etc.

Now for them to survive planting and the heat.  It suddenly got in the 90’s and there has been a lack of rain so far this year.  We’ll see how it goes.  I’m not above knowing when I have been beat and heading to the local hardware store to buy plants.  I think I have enough to outlast that though.  There are over 34 cucumber plants in this mix, for example.  I only need 4.