Jan 142018
 

Beans.

According to Answers.com:

There is no exact number, but the world gene banks set the count at about 40,000 different types of beans,

though only a very small number of these bean types are mass-produced for common consumption.

These little orbs of understatedness are great sources of fiber and protein.  They are easy to grow, can be dried and stored, and are light to transport.  They can be cooked, baked, roasted, or eaten raw.

They are also mushy. And have funny smells.  Did I mention they are mushy?

This past fall we had significant decrease in our income, with an unknown end in sight.  Therefore, even that extra $.10 at the store felt like $1,000.  The extra trip across town caused pain as I thought about the cost of gas to get us there, all while hoping no one would hit us.

Among other things I did to give some immediate relief was to take up couponing again.  I had never fully stopped, but had relaxed on it a bit.  Now I pulled out all the habits I used to do, while learning new ones.  New rebate apps were installed on my phone and new websites found which helped me find deals at my local stores.

We were very blessed that first month or two with a lot of “free after rebate” or “free with a coupon” items.  Between those items and our pantry we were doing okay in the food budget arena.  There was no steak on the menu, though ribs were in the freezer.

Then IT happened.  I saw a deal at a local grocery for another free item!  I quickly checked it out only to my horror to find myself torn.

“But…but…I don’t like those!” said my selfish side.

“They are good for you.  The kids don’t know you don’t like them. Mom would get quite the laugh.  And they are FREE!” said my more rational side.

“But I don’t like them!” I repeated.

Two nights later we were having (free) beans and cornbread for supper.  I was pleasantly surprised that the beans were actually good.  Though you would have heard this conversation at the dinner table:

“Come on, boys, eat up.  Your supper is better warm than cold.” (trust me I know, I wanted to add.)

“But…Mom, I don’t like these.” Boy 1 said.

“These are good for you.  If you eat them with the cornbread you can’t even taste them.”

“But, Mom.  I don’t like them.”

“Sorry, Sweetie.  This is what is for supper.  If you want dessert you need to eat what is in your bowl.” (Did I really just say that about beans????  Me!?!?!)

There was a lot of thought taking place in their brains as to whether it was worth it to eat the beans or not.  Eventually all kids ate their supper and earned dessert (i.e. choice of leftover Halloween candy).

Frugality won out over great dislike in this case.  While I did not run out immediately to buy a year’s supply of this item, I did realize that even I survived eating something I did not think I would like.  Our bank account thanked me that week.

We are now at a place where our income is back up.  However, at that time, we did not know if it would for 6 month, a year, or longer.  We gave great thanks for our safety net, for skills we have learned over the years, for a plan we formulated early in our marriage if such a thing ever happened, and for all the blessings we saw happen after this time.

And yes, I even gave thanks for the beans.

Jan 092018
 

This post contains affiliate links.

The digital rewards site Swagbucks is offering big payouts during their January “Swago” promotion starting Monday, January 8th at 9am PT and running until Monday, January 15th! Swago is just like bingo, but in this case you’re filling out squares as you earn points on their site for doing things you already do online. If you’re thinking of trying Swagbucks, this is a great chance to learn all about how the site works and earn bonus points while doing it, meaning you can get more gift cards faster. Here are a few tips:

Each square on your Swago Board will contain an action item to complete. They can be anything from getting a search win, completing a survey, or just visiting one of our popular stores!

Once you complete the action item in a particular square the square will change color signifying the action item is complete.

You have until 12pm PT/3pm ET on Monday, January 15th to mark off as many squares as possible so use your time wisely.

Be mindful of the patterns and their corresponding bonuses located on the right of your Swago Board. The patterns will vary in difficulty and bonus value. Once you’ve achieved a pattern, the corresponding “Submit” button will light up. You can have multiple patterns available for submission, however, you can only submit ONE pattern so choose wisely.

Each activity you successfully complete on your Swago Board will give you anywhere from 1-20 spins on the Spin & Win Wheel. PLUS, when you submit your board for a bonus you’ll get additional spins. The number of spins will depend on the pattern you complete. The wheel has all sorts of great prizes that you can win, and each spin is a winner!

The Spin & Win Wheel will be available all throughout Swago and you have until 11:59pm PT on Monday, January 15th to use all your spins.

Fill up your board and then submit your pattern to get even more points – if you can fill in the whole board, you get a 500 SB bonus, which is enough for a $5 gift card from the retailer of your choice.

Click here right now and click “Join” to get started! If you don’t already have a Swagbucks account, you’ll be able to quickly sign up; PLUS, if you earn 300 SB before the first of January, you’ll get a bonus 300 SB!

Jan 072018
 

This post contains affiliate links.

“The third time is charm!”

As the upcoming gardening season planning commences, I hold out hope that this saying continues to ring true.

This will be my third garden in as many states. The prior two looked vastly different from each other, though taught me a lot about gardening. I have come to find I do better in a raised bed garden, fertilizing naturally with compost or lasagna gardening, and with some perennials included.

As I look at my mostly blank slate of a yard my brain is bombarded with plans, ideas, and to-do lists.  So much to do – if I took time to relearn some of the past lessons, the yard would take over a decade to get close to what I want. However, if I do it all at once it would cost a pretty penny. I may afraid at that point to change anything, knowing how much it cost to put in.

This thinking started this past summer/fall as I mowed the grass. I would picture various plants, structures, etc. in different locations. I would work through pros and cons of said decisions. I would “try out” different garden strategies for various micro climates around our yard (about 0.25 acres).  I noted changes and challenges in the yard as seasons progressed. I also took time to see how our neighbors used their yards.

With all these thoughts in my head, I began to eliminate ideas, morph others to fit together, prioritize desires, and realize how we are living in our current home.  I came to the realization that I need to plan for future results (fruit, flower beds, arbor/swing support) while addressing some current, foundational needs (vegetable garden beds, compost, etc). Having an end goal in mind meant I could begin planning for now and later, allowing myself room to grow and add in the future.

Compost

One of the biggest lessons I learn from my Small Town garden was the importance of compost. Three ways I tried composting there were: vermiculture, composting in place/lasagna gardening, and an open compost pile.

My pile never got hot enough to fully compost, most breaking down of materials was due to time and insect/worm activity.

My bout with vermiculture led to my love and awe of worms. However I had trouble keeping their bed dry enough and free from castings. I finally added them to my raised beds, which gave much better results. Between the worms and a loose form of lasagna gardening, including addition of coffee grounds, I began to see improvement in my plants.

With the new garden there were a few things to keep in mind which would reqire a few changes in how I composted:

  • We no longer have 5 or 6 mature deciduous trees in our yard, dropping copious amounts of leaves every fall.
  • Fire ants. These little guys live loose soil and will come back to the same places over and over. I really do not want a colony of them living in a compost pile.
  • Bugs, as in insects, as in mosquitos. With warmer weather comes warmer winters. Fewer freezing temps mean less opportunity to kill off overwintering insects. Mosquitos need very little water to breed. I do not want to inadvertently create small pools of standing water around a compost pile. Nor attract gnats and flies.
  • Our neighbors are closer. Even if I wanted to put a compost pile at the back of our yard,  it would be at the side of our neighbor’s house. They spend a fair amount of time outside and would not appreciate extra smells or bugs.
  • I need compost. This year preferably. With new plants and beds being planned I can not wait years for compost. Nor do I want to go spend $$$ on bags of compost and sail from the store. One of the reasons I garden is to save money, not spend it.

With these thoughts in mind I searched for solutions, finally alighting on a compost tumbler.

With an enclosed container, insects and bugs should be at minimum. I would not have to turn the pile with a shovel, instead turning the container when I add items, or several times a week.  Fire ants would be unlikely to climb in. Results will be faster coming, perhaps as soon as a few weeks.

While I could have built a compost bin from free materials, it would have taken more time (to build and find the items, as well as turn the pile) and still have presented some of the challenges.  I believe a traditional compost pile or bin is beneficial, I no longer believe it is the answer for every situation.

Starting back in November, I began to save up my Swagbucks points, called SB.

By using my time to complete activities online rather than looking for materials, I saved effort, gas, and frustration (from listening to kids complain). I was able to watch videos while doing laundry and/or homeschooling, complete surveys while waiting for kids to fall asleep, and search for answers online, all while earning cents. It is amazing how the cents can grow.

At the beginning half of January I had earned enough to redeem my points for PayPal gift cards. With the money in PayPal I clicked through the Swagbucks website to purchase the tumbler via online shopping.  In this way I am able to earn back, in SB, a portion of what I spent. (Note: I did not purchase from Amazon, though I could have. If I was buying from Amazon I would have redeemed from Amazon gift cards instead of PayPal.)

I was able to take advantage of free shipping and save a trip to the store for pick-up.

Utilizing homemade compost via a tumbler should pay off in the first year or two, depending on how consistent I am in adding to the tumbler and mixing.  Not only am I reusing parts of food I had  already paid for, but also creating a product I need but no longer have to  purchase. This product will in turn help other plants grown, giving better results.

What a great way to Grow Your Cents!

If you haven’t tried Swagbucks before, you can get a bonus $3 for signing up as my referral during January. Swagbucks is a rewards site where you earn points (called SB) for things you’re probably doing online already, like searching, watching videos, discovering deals, and taking surveys. Then you take those points and exchange them for gift cards to places like Amazon, Starbucks, Walmart, Target, or PayPal cash.

When you sign up through me this month, you can earn a $3 bonus! Here’s how:

1. Sign up using this link

2. Earn 300 SB total before 2/1/18. You’ll get a $3 (300 SB) bonus for it!

3. If you want even more bonuses, you’ll get a $10 (1000 SB rebate) bonus for making your first shop purchase! That’s in addition to the SB you earn for every dollar you spend.

That’s it. It’s super easy.

Jan 052018
 

Growing up, I was the kid in the house who loved when we had beans and cornbread for supper.  Loved it!

I was also the kid who was at the table two hours after supper was done because I still had the required 3 beans sitting, cold, on my plate.  Yes, I took only the exact number of beans I was told I was required to eat.

I HATED beans. (Though I did eat them when I was at other people’s homes because that was the polite thing to do.)

Yes, this meant I technically loved it when we had bean broth and cornbread for supper.  What can I say, apparently it was not the flavor which turned me off. (Yes, it was sort of a running joke as years went by and I never gave in to actually eating the beans.)

Once I was off to college and had begun to grow even more in my frugalness, I didn’t want to spend extra money on the few meals I needed to eat outside of the dorm cafeteria.  Sometimes I would spring for a pudding cup and pack of peanut butter crackers from the vending machine, but not regularly. After all, that cost me a whole $1.50!

My favorite money saving ideas were:

  • take the extra piece of fruit we were allowed when leaving the cafeteria, resulting in my first attempts at shakes for breakfast
  • skip breakfast and eat lunch early at the cafeteria where you could go back for more.  That way I only needed two meals in a day
  • to make the most of what I could get from the to-go cafeteria when I did eat there

 

Hummus was a new food for me.  Well, sort of.  I had heard of it, but it was not on anyone’s meal plan in the rural, Midwestern county I was from.  Less you think there were no culturally significant food options growing up, we had lovely cuisine choices, such as:

  • turtle soup – preferably cooked in a big pot over a fire, in the fall, with a gathering of friends
  • burgoo – preferably cooked in a big pot over a fire, till you could not distinguish what anything really was, in the fall, with a gathering of friends. Hey, what can I say?  If you are going to be cleaning out your freezer, may as well enjoy it in the company of friends.
  • meatloaf, with ketchup on top
  • green bean casserole

But, back to hummus.  I knew hummus was good for you, that it was nutritious.   I also knew that I liked the flavor but NOT the texture.  I knew I could get a fair amount of it from the to-go cafeteria and add it to raw vegetables for a lunch/snack while between classes.  What I did not know was what it was made of.

Imagine my surprise when I learned it was made from…well, chickpeas of all things. Yuck! Those plump, squishy, horridly textured chickpeas.  BUT, I was cheap and looking to eat somewhat healthy.  So, I sucked it up and found a way to each hummus – by putting it on the top of the vegetables so it did not touch my tongue as I ate it.  And that is how I came to eat hummus.

After I graduate and got married, I had not fully gotten into trying new meals, or meal planning. Nor was I very educated in the use of coupons and shopping sales.  My idea of keeping the budget in-line was to find the 5 or so meals I liked and rotate them.

I was okay with having pretty much the same thing for lunch every day.  For weeks.  No worries, there was variety – I would change the fruit I had with my sandwich and the flavor of yogurt.  See, variety.  🙂

My husband, who did NOT grow up in the Midwest, but actually came from a place that used spices beyond salt, pepper, and ketchup, requested I learn some new recipes.  Apparently he did not like the same 5 basic meals over and over.  Hmm.

Over time we came to find that we both liked particular beans.  Usually the same ones – black beans, lentils, baked beans, and limited amounts of chickpeas.  I do buy green peas because I love my husband who loves early peas.  However, that does not mean I also need to eat them.  Now that I am a parent, I silently say nothing as I spoon them up on the kids’ plates, while leaving mine void of any green orbs.

As for other beans, well ….”Grandma makes great lima beans.  Perhaps you can ask her to make you some next time you go there.”

to be continued…

Jan 022018
 

This post may contain affiliate links.


Needing extra encouragement with your meal planning resolution? Looking for new ideas? Are you more of a visual learner? Then you do not want to miss this 3-hour live Meal-Plan-Along with 5 Food Bloggers on Wednesday January 3, 2018.

They’re dealing with the same responsibilities as you: laundry piles, bedtime stories, snow shoveling, bill paying, work stress…

And still they get delicious, wholesome (and even pretty) meals on the table? What gives?

Well, you’re about to find out by going behind-the-scenes, and right into their kitchens!

It’s called the Meal-Plan-Along, and here are all the can’t-miss details:

Five VIP bloggers are joining forces with Ultimate Bundles on January 3rd from 4-7 pm ET/1-4pm PT. 

You can curl up with a warm drink, and maybe a basket of clean laundry, and join us virtually through your computer or mobile device.

Wardee Harmon of Traditional Cooking Schoolwill be spilling her time-saving secrets using the slow cooker and pressure cooker to meal plan.

Does meal planning feel stressful? Get this: Katie Kimball from Kitchen Stewardship will be talking about how meal planning can reduce your stress.

If the whole idea is a bit daunting, fear not… Kresha Faber from Nourishing Joy will be sharing meal planning techniques for beginners.

One big reason for meal planning is to save you money! Susan Heid from The Confident Mom will be dishing out her tips for meal planning on a budget.

If any member of your family has allergies, don’t worry! Elise New from Frugal Farm Wife is going to drop some knowledge bombs on how to meal plan around food allergies.

And to finish it out, Stephanie Langford from Ultimate Bundles will be hosting the whole event and will be chiming in with some ninja batching and freezer cooking secrets (when you’ve got five kids who want to eat every day, you find shortcuts).

Follow along to see how six different women feed their families using simple strategies to stay more organized, make meals come together more easily, spend less time cooking, and ensure healthy meals make it to the table even in the busy times.

2018 doesn’t have to be the year of food waste, sky-high grocery bills, unhealthy meals, and last-minute takeout. You can do this, and we can’t wait to show you how to make it all easier and more doable!

Register for the FREE live event on January 3rd right here.

Dec 262017
 

This post contains affiliate links.


This sale will be over in a flash! December 26th only, stock up on new faves for your family and save 75% off your order at Schoola.com with promo code FAST75.

Schoola has been one of my favorite ways to save money on clothes and save time by shopping from home.  With a kid who has grown, again, I will definitely be checking here today to see if I can help fill in a few current needs. This is also a great time to begin thinking ahead to spring and summer clothes.

Send a friend $10 off to shop the amazing deals on children’s clothes at Schoola.com and you’ll get $10 off too. Shop now!

And don’t forget, orders of $25 or more (up to 10 items) always qualify for free shipping!

*Fine print: Discounts and credits do not apply toward the free shipping threshold or promotional minimums. Discounts are applied to the post-credit order value. New-with-tags items are not eligible for purchase with discounts or credits.

Sale ends 11:59 PM PST December 26

 

Dec 212017
 

Looking for a quick craft to add interest and color to your garden? How about a gift without spending a lot of money? Glass Garden Flowers, also known as plate flowers, are the perfect fit!

Materials needed:

  • tube e6000 glue
  • acetone
  • cotton swab
  • various plates, saucers, cups, candle holders, lids, condiment dishes, etc.
  • PVC elbow pieces, conduit connectors, bud vases, etc. for back
  • paper towel
  • sheet/drop cloth – not mandatory, but will make clean up easier
  • Pipe or rebar, to act as a “stem”

Step 1

Gather various ceramic or glass pieces. Plastic ones work, too, but may not hold up in cold weather. I picked up an assortment while at a thrift store. Turned out to be “50% off everything” day. The pieces I picked up ranged in price from $0.25-$1. I could have spent more, but was looking to make several without spending a lot out-of-pocket.

Step 2

Clean pieces. To get glue, residual stickers, and marker off, use a cotton swab dipped in acetone. (You can pick up a bottle of finger nail polish remover and cotton swabs from the Dollar Tree if you do not have any.) I find it easier to pour a bit into the lid and wet the swabs from there.

Dry thoroughly.

Step 3

Pair pieces together to get the look you want. Play around with the arrangements. Not all combinations looked like I thought they would, while others surprisingly worked.

Once you get them arranged like you want, take a picture if you plan on moving them. 😉

Step 4

Glue pieces together. Working with one group at a time, deconstruct the stack. Working from the bottom up, glue pieces together.

Step 5

Glue connector on the back. After letting the pieces dry enough not to move, flip the stack over and glue a connector piece on the back.

There are many various ways to do this. I tried three – using a bud vase, using conduit connectors and using PVC pipe elbows. Each has their benefits and drawbacks.

Bud vases – can be found cheaply and often in abundance. However, if the vase is too big, the flower will “dropped” on the support post. These also add weight.

Conduit connectors – cost a bit more (around $0.40 each in a pack of 5), are stocked at local hardware stores, and lighter in weight than vases.

One potential downside I noticed is the open side pointing up. This means rain can go down your support pipe, if it also happens to be hollow. If you live in a cold region this may result in snow, ice, or freezing of precipitation in this area. A solution would be to glue a coin or small metal piece on top of these.

PVC elbows – light weight, cost me around $0.40 each, found commonly at local hardware stores (or leftover from a DIY project), easy to attach, and snug fit to post. Not sure how these hold up in cold weather, as I have not tested them.

One lesson I did learn, thankfully before the glue cured completely, was to place the metal connectors far enough back from the edge of the plates so the posts can actually fit into them. Be aware of the lip along the bottom of the plate!

Step 6

Create, install, and attach to a support stem. This can be a variety of items, anything which is strong enough to support the weight of the flower. Some use rebar, conduit pipes, or other metal structures. PVC pipe is too flexible to use and would potentially break under the weight and deteriorate from being exposed to the weather.

If your flower is small enough, you may be able to use copper pipe.  I love the color these add, though it is more expensive and was too flexible for the weight I was working with.

I cut my poles to 2.5 ft, pounded them into the ground about 6 inches (till they felt secure), then placed the flowers on top. While I did not use rebar the help support the flowers, I believe I will do so in the Spring, due to the kind of soil we have. Inserting a foot or foot and a half into the ground, then sliding the “stem” over it would be an even sturdier option in my garden.

Enjoy!

Dec 042017
 

This post contains affiliate links. If you sign up through one of the links below, I will receive a portion of your points earned, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for helping support this blog.

It is getting to be crunch time – the winter gift giving season is upon us. Hopefully your plans have all materialized and you are sitting with your feet up, admiring your beautifully wrapped packages.

If that isn’t the case, you (I) still have time.

My husband and kids are going to take time around the new year to visit his family out of state. At first I thought this would work well, I would send their gifts with him. Quickly I rethought that plan as they will be flying instead of driving.  No use giving him more things to keep track of while traveling.

I might include smaller gifts from my kids to those there, but only if they will fit in the kids’ suitcases. The rest of the somewhat-yet-to-be-determined items will be sent via Santa’s big brown sleigh. While this limits the purchasing options somewhat, it does mean I can shop through Swagbucks’ website and earn points, called SB, back on my purchases.

I am going to put this next statement in bold, because I fo believe it is that important – If you have to put purchases in a card which will take you weeks or months to pay off, DON’T. Smiles and “joy” for one day is not worth 6 months of payments plus interest! Spend time together cooking, camping, watching the stars. Go to a new library and read together or play with the toys. Visit a museum on a ‘Free Admission’ day, then have a treat of not typical items you got for free or almost free after discount/coupon. Memories will last longer than any toy, clothing items, music CD.

Online shopping is not the main way I earn SB to use towards redeeming for gifts cards and PayPal, but it is one available way.  Others I know, who shop online more than I, find this a great way to get back a little of what they would be spending anyway. For them, it is their biggest method of earning SB. This flexibility in ways to earn is one of the reasons I like Swagbucks – you can adjust your earning methods according to what life is like at that moment.

The digital rewards site Swagbucks is offering big payouts during their December “Swago” promotion starting Monday, December 4th at 9am PT and running until Monday, December 11th! Swago is just like bingo, but in this case you’re filling out squares as you earn points on their site for doing things you already do online.

While some squares may require s purchase for you to “cover” that square, not all do.  Most months I am able to achieve a pattern, to qualify for bonus SB, without purchasing anything at all.

Tip: do not forget to submit your board before the promotion ends. I may or may not have done that a time or two. You can not submit it once the promotion is over!

If you’re thinking of trying Swagbucks, this is a great chance to learn all about how the site works and earn bonus points while doing it, meaning you can get more gift cards faster.

Here are a few tips:
  • Each square on your Swago Board will contain an action item to complete. They can be anything from getting a search win, completing a survey, or just visiting one of our popular stores!
  • Once you complete the action item in a particular square the square will change color signifying the action item is complete.
  • You have until 12pm PT/3pm ET on Monday, December 11th to mark off as many squares as possible so use your time wisely.
  • Be mindful of the patterns and their corresponding bonuses located on the right of your Swago Board. The patterns will vary in difficulty and bonus value. Once you’ve achieved a pattern, the corresponding “Submit” button will light up. You can have multiple patterns available for submission, however, you can only submit ONE pattern so choose wisely.
  • Each activity you successfully complete on your Swago Board will give you anywhere from 1-20 spins on the Spin & Win Wheel. PLUS, when you submit your board for a bonus you’ll get additional spins. The number of spins will depend on the pattern you complete. The wheel has all sorts of great prizes that you can win, and each spin is a winner!
  • The Spin & Win Wheel will be available all throughout Swago and you have until 11:59pm PT on Monday, December 11th to use all your spins.
  • Fill up your board and then submit your pattern to get even more points – if you can fill in the whole board, you get a 500 SB bonus, which is enough for a $5 gift card from the retailer of your choice.

Click here right now and click “Join” to get started! If you don’t already have a Swagbucks account, you’ll be able to quickly sign up; PLUS, if you earn 300 SB before the first of January, you’ll get a bonus 300 SB!

Nov 292017
 

Here is a flashback from our home in Small Town.  One of the things I realized after we moved was all the free time I had.  I had not realized the amount of time working on the house, thinking about working on the house, contemplating working on the house, and shopping for items so I could work on the house had been taking up over the weeks and months.  I was sooooo happy when this project was completed…then we moved.  🙂 Hey, at least I got to enjoy it for a few months.

I am finally on to my last big project area – the garage.  This is something I have been working on bit by bit over the past few months.  First I painted all the walls in the fall, before the cold weather set in for winter.  Then the area became a storage/project area.

Finally, a month or two ago, I was set about connecting the second garage door opener.  A few weeks back we had gravel installed in order to allow me to enter the garage without driving through mud.  It was a great feeling.

This past weekend, I wanted to start actually tackling setting up all the pieces to make it look like more of an organized area and less like a pile of half-finished projects.

Step 1: Move things away from the back wall and sweep the floor.  I chose to start with the largest visual area for several reasons – it would give me a flat surface to work on, it would give me storage areas for the smaller items, it would free up floor space, and it would be a great motivator for later on when I start getting frustrated and depressed about how long this job is taking.

Step 2: Begin a list of all the things I need from the hardware store. It did not take long for me to realize I needed some items to finish up various parts of this organization project.  For starters, one of my cabinets needs a new shelf inside before I can attach the counter top.  A drawer needs a new bottom.  I am looking to add a shelf between my two lower cabinets. The list kept getting longer, so I grabbed a pencil and paper and put it all down.  Hopefully this will help reduce the number of trips to the store, as well as allow me to keep my eyes open for these items elsewhere (a.k.a. find them used or free).

Step 3: Set things up where they will be going. After moving things away from the back wall, which is where I am going to start, and cleaning up, I began to put things back into place where I will be wanting them to go.  My mind’s eye had pretty much figured out what it wanted, but actually putting them there showed me a few problems.

For starters, there is an electrical conduit close to the floor. When this conduit reaches the corner, it makes a rounded turn.  This prevents me from putting a cabinet all the way in the corner.  I decided to leave about 6 inches between the cabinet and the wall, allowing me space to store my saw-horses.  A problem just became a solution for another problem I was having – where to store larger items. Sometimes you need to step back and view things from a different angle.

Step 4: Place other items near where you think you want them. Not all of our old kitchen cabinets will be placed by the work bench.  There are two smaller cabinets that I am going to use near the walk-out door.  These will be great to keep things like deicer, ice scrapers, sunscreen, bug spray, and other season items we might need to grab quickly.

There are also several wire baskets I plan to use to help organize toys, as well as shelf supports I want to use in the laundry area.  These are placed near those locations to help those steps go quicker.  This also helps get things out of the way for the particular area I am working in at this time.

Step 5: Stop for lunch. This is often something I forget to do when working on a larger project.  It is much easier for me to keep going.  However, after a while I start to slow down, problems begin cropping up at each turn, and my kids get really whiny.

This time, before all the above happened, I called it time for lunch and put down all I was working on at the moment.  Things were going well. Ending, and beginning, on a good note always helps.

Nov 202017
 

This is another post which was written, but never shared.  It was waiting for the time I could share before and after pictures.  HOWEVER, there never were any after pictures as it never got painted.  This particular item is still with us, in its original state of being stained.  Currently it sits next to the fireplace, holding various library books.  It is still an easy DIY project, if you are looking for something similar.  

Garbage day is not only for getting rid of trash in your house, but can also be a source for ‘new’ items.  Because we live in Small Town and it is, well, small, I do not go driving around town looking for items placed out by trash cans.  However, sometimes I spot something and stop to take a look.  There is also a sort of unspoken rule that if you do not want something you sit it out by the trash cans, or along the street in front of your house, at any point during the week and others will probably take it.

This is how I ended up with an old magazine rack.  While we do not have magazines around here, we do have a lot of newspapers.  Specifically, my husband’s newspapers. I get so tired of stacks here and there, never knowing which have been read and which have not.  Knowing that he loves reading them, though, I try not to get rid of something without asking him.

Initially when I saw this, I thought that perhaps I could clean it up and find a new home for it.  Then I thought of the newspapers and knew what its new purpose would be – a newspaper rack.  Then it sat on my washer for several months.  Even find that happening at your house?

Every time I went to do a load of laundry I contemplated what to do with the ‘new’ find – I did not want to leave it the wood color it was, as we already have a lot of wood in the house.  Black would show every little bit of dirt and dust, of which we have a lot here in this part of the country.  White would get dingy from fingerprints.  Finally, out of indecisivness I told my husband my plans and asked his opinion.

“Paint it green.”

“Okay, what kind of green?”

“You decide.  Just make it green.”

Well, that was easy.  Months of me thinking about it and it took him all of 10 seconds.  By the way, this is how our wedding colors were decided, I took him to the paint section in a store and told him to find colors he liked.  I was trying to involve him in the process, he just wanted it to be decided quickly.

I have never spray painted furniture before, though I have done so with some metal vents in our house.  I knew that with wood, especially an item that had already had a finish on it, there were more steps beyond: 1. wash, 2. Paint.  To the internet I went.  Here are some of the links I found helpful.

Furniture Makeover: Spray Painting Wood Chairs

http://www.bluecricketdesign.net/2009/07/furniture-refinishing.html