Mar 142017
 

This post from a few years ago came up in a search I did recently.  Reading through it, I was reminded of how our gardening can start off with great intentions, but time can make us forget the blessings and larger purpose it may serve.  

Botanical Garden Fountain
Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies.

 

The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil.

 

She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life.

your  husband will appreciate your gardening efforts if you include items and varieties he likes.

She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands.

playing in the dirt is actually called “working”.

She is like the merchants’ ships; she bringeth her food from afar.

it is okay to not grow everything. instead go to the produce auction or farmer’s market if there are things you want but can’t grow due to time or space.

She riseth also while it is yet night, and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens.
you don’t have to do it all yourself, hire help as needed. different stages in life call for different things.
She considereth a field, and buyeth it: with the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard.

gardening … need I say more?

She girdeth her loins with strength, and strengtheneth her arms.

pulling weeds … and weeds … there are more? Didn’t I just pull those?!? (not such an issue with raised beds, but we did have to haul in dirt and build the boxes)

She perceiveth that her merchandise is good: her candle goeth not out by night.

endless nights of canning, because you still have so much yet to do.  meanwhile, the next crop is ripe and ready to be put up.

She layeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff.
She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea, she reacheth forth her hands to the needy.

have you ever “blessed” someone with a random bag of zucchini?

She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet.

all the canning and preserving serves a valuable purpose during the colder months. (or when a new child in the home meant not being able to shop as much for two months, those stores were very much a blessing.)

She maketh herself coverings of tapestry; her clothing is silk and purple.

when not in the garden, you are allowed to do non-gardening related crafts.  even better if it is something useful.

Her husband is known in the gates, when he sitteth among the elders of the land.

our gardening habits will also reflect upon the rest of our household.  let it be a good reflection upon them.

She maketh fine linen, and selleth it; and delivereth girdles unto the merchant.

otherwise known as running a produce stand, listing extras on Craigslist, trading for other items or services, selling at a local store, etc.  

Strength and honour are her clothing; and she shall rejoice in time to come.

all that planning means rejoicing when the first vegetable or bloom appears in the garden.  it wasn’t all for naught.

She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness.

learn from those who have done it for more seasons than you, and share kindly with the new gardener just starting out.  you were there once too.

She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness.

while it would be great to sit and watch the flowers and birds (or hang out on the favorite social media site), we can’t do that all day.

Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.

gardening should not make you grumpy, short tempered, annoyed, or isolated.  instead it should add happiness to your home. if it doesn’t, then you need to sit down and redo you gardening plan.

Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.
Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised.

your house may be perfect; your garden beds weed free, organic and trimmed; and you may even be one of those gardeners who can work outside for an hour in the humidity without a hair coming out of place or breaking a nail.  If your heart is not in the right place, though, it doesn’t mean a thing.  

Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.

enjoy what you have worked to make happen.  now would be the time to get that cup of tea (or peppermint cappuccino) and enjoy the flowers and birds, knowing that you have worked hard and blessed others … till it is time to go weed again or put the next load of jars in the canner.

PROVERBS 31: 10-31 (KJV)

Vase of roses in window

Bible passage taken from KingJamesBibleOnline

growinghomemakers link-up banner Modest Mom blog button copy

Jan 252017
 

 

farmers market table selling

Selling at Farmers’ Markets can be fun and slightly addictive. The people are great and they usually have something in common, a love of gardening, or at least the fresh results from gardening.

When thinking about selling at a farmers’ market, do not feel like you have to be kept in the box of plants and fresh produce. Check with the rules of your market first, but there are many other related items you could sell.

1. Hanging gutter garden

2. Mason Jar Solar Light –   Great use for jars that you would no longer can in

3. Recycled pallet planters

4. Wind chimes – you can change these up by adjusting the decorations on top

 

What are some other items you could think of making? Are there places, beyond your Farmer’s Market, where you sell?

Feb 112016
 

produce auction collage

This post is part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

New Jersey is called The Garden State for a reason, though it originally had little to do with gardening.  Coming in as one of the smaller states in the Union, there are still 5 different climates found within its borders.

There are currently 2 produce auctions found within New Jersey’s borders:

Vineland Produce Auction

1088 N Main Road

Vineland, New Jersey 08360
Phone: 856-691-0721
Fax: 856-794-2301

Email: info@vinelandproduce.com

Website: www.vinelandproduce.com

Open mid-April through late November. Auction are held Monday – Saturday at 10:45 a.m.

Tri-County Cooperative Auction Market
619 Route 33 West
Hightstown, NJ 08520
Phone: 609-448-0193

Email: Bill@tricountycoop.net

Website:

Auctions held Monday, Wednesdays, and Fridays starting at 5:30 p.m.  Call to check for the opening of the auction season

There used to be a third auction, Swedesboro Auction, though I was having trouble finding detailed information. When I could not find any more information than the basics, I called the phone number listed.  Unfortunantly it had been disconnected.  So the searching continued.

The results?  The Swedesboro Auction is no longer in existence.  Instead the Former Swedesboro Auction property to be preserved as open space.

The acquisition of the Swedesboro Auction property completes an eight-year effort to save not only the last significant piece of open space in Swedesboro, but also an important part of our history that will be preserved to remind people of the important role agriculture played in Swedesboro’s past.”  -County Freeholder Robert Damminger

Having spent time on the East Coast, I know that open space can be very limited.  While I am glad to see that this will not become another developed area, I am sad at the loss of a market for both sellers and buyers.

The Landisville Produce Auction was another name I came across.  This one was a bit harder to find, as I believe the name officially is the Landisville Produce CoOp and there are no live auctions held.  An article on the Press Of Atlantic City website from 2013 gave more information.  It turns out that the Landisville Produce Auction may be the oldest in the country.  The combination of history and gardening always catches my attention.

Felix Donato owner of Landisville Produce Cooperative, the oldest agricultural coop in the nation
Feb 042016
 

produce auction collage

This post is part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

New York State currently has 6 produce auction sites across the state.  Most are held on Tuesdays and Fridays, though some also are held on Mondays.  You will want to check their times and days before heading out, especially early and late in the season.

Finger Lake Times wrote an article in 2013 about the Seneca Produce Auction.  It was nice to hear from those who bought and sold at this auction, as well as those who help run it.

Often we hear from the buyers at an auction, about worries concerning available produce.  Here is a look from A Farmer’s Perspective: The Talk at the Produce Auction.

Cornell University’s Extension Office has a pdf available showing the locations of produce auctions in the state of New York.  Their map may give you a better idea where the closest produce auction would be for you.

Chautauqua Produce Auction
7844 Rt. 474, Clymer, New York 14724
Phone: (716) 355-6500 or (716) 355-6391
Time: Tues. & Fri. at 10:00 am
Email: nwesterberg@stny.rr.com
Website: www.chautauquaproduceauction.com

Finger Lakes Produce Auction
3691 Route 14A, Penn Yan, New York 14527
Phone: (315) 531-8446
Time: Mon. at 10:00 am, Wed. & Fri. at 9:00 am
Website: www.fingerlakesproduceauction.com

Finger Lakes Produce Auction’s Facebook page

Genesee Valley Produce Auction
8855 Country Road 3, P.O. Box 163, Centerville, NY 14029
Phone: (585) 567-8640 (auction days from 8:30 am)
Phone: (585) 567-4312 (8-8:30 am all other days)
Time: Tues. & Fri. at 10:00 am

Mohawk Valley Produce Auction
840 Fordsbush Road
Fort Plain, New York 13339
Phone: (518) 568-3579
Time: Tues. and Fri. at 10:00 am

Orleans Produce Auction
12590 Ridge Rd., Albion, NY 14411
Phone: (585) 798-5466
Time: Mon. at 11:00 am, Tues. & Fri. at 10:00 am

Website: www.bontragerauction.com/orleans-produce-auction

Seneca Produce Auction
2033 Yerkes Road, Romulus, NY 14541
Phone: (607) 869-5470
Time: Tues. at 10:00 am, Fri. at 10:00 am

Seneca Produce Auction’s Facebook page

Jan 142016
 

produce auction collage

This post in part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

While the weather is turning down right frigid in various parts of the country, before you know it Spring will be knocking at your door. While you are looking through your seed catalogs and planning out your new garden’s beginnings, try adding in a bit of fun and adventure – check out a local produce auction. In the Spring, you may find plants as well as fresh spring vegetables.  Some of the auctions start in April others will hold off till May.

Wakarusa Produce Auction  Open 3 days a week: Monday 1 p.m., Wednesday 11 a.m., Friday 11 a.m.  From their website:

“We are open from the last week in April to the end of October. We auction produce grown in Elkhart County by local farmers. “

 

Adams County Flower & Produce Auction LLC – from their website:

Opening for business in July 2004, our purpose is to sell high quality produce grown by local farmers specifically for wholesale buyers such as stores, roadside stands, farm markets, distribution companies, etc. Located in Northern Indiana, auctions are held April thru October EVERY TUESDAY & THURSDAY AT 10:00 AM, with specialty auction dates for Hay, Straw and Firewood.

 Wayne County Produce Auction – located in Williamsburg, Indiana.  According to an article written in 2013 on Amish365.com , “The auction is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Oct. 19. The only exceptions are Oct. 3 and 10. The auction opens at 1 p.m. Mondays and 10 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays.”

 

Rockville Produce Auction is located in Rockville, Indiana.  A Midwest Living article shares the following information:

“The auction schedule varies, but generally sales are held May through October, at 2 p.m. Mondays and 10 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. (Call ahead to confirm.) If you’re planning to bid, buy a number in the front office ($10 per season) before joining the action.”

Daviess County Produce Auctionlocated at 5667 N County Road 900 E, Montgomery, Indiana begins their auctions in mid-April and end in October.  The year starts off with items you can use to decorate your yard, as well as plants for the garden.  As the year continues you will be able to find in season vegetables and fruits.  Their phone number is 812-486-2445.  Sales begin at 1 p.m. on Mondays, 9 a.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays.

Dec 292015
 

first 2013 produce stand

This past year was harder than I had anticipated.  Though I will further explore that statement later, I want to talk about one aspect in particular relating to this past year – the street-side produce stand.

Since 2009 I have put a small stand out in front of the house.  It started with extra produce which was more than I could give away at church.  The idea was to charge less than Small Town Grocery, who is expensive and has a poor selection,  but enough to cover my gardening costs.  I was not in it to get rich.

Over time I have come to realize how much my neighbors appreciate the close availability of fresh produce.  The working mom across the street would send her kids over for peppers to make with supper.  The assisted living residents would stop by for a tomato or a hanging basket of begonias, as those were one of the few plants able to grow in the limited light of their apartments. Someone canning and needing just a few more tomatoes knew were to stop. The family with only a few dollars to spend on fresh produce could make their money go further.  The neighbor across the street bought me out of bedding plants to complete her yard work.  The mail carrier needing a few things, but no time to run into the store after work.  As time went on, I began to get a feel for the community, realizing what a blessing this was for people.  That is one thing I would remember when I needed the extra energy to keep it going.

(Side note: my husband recently shared with me that at least one person stopped and bought from the stand assuming we needed the money. “Why else would someone do it?”, they reasoned. )

cart of produce auction hay tomato apples

The stand was started before we became foster parents, before the loss of my husband’s father, before the loss of someone close to me to suicide, and before other trials in our lives. It was one of the things I would do to keep my sanity in times of otherwise emotional chaos.

Over time, my friendship with my neighbor grew due to the time we spent on gardening related activities, including running this stand together.  Without her, I am not sure I could have seen it through that first summer with George and Jack.  The following year she had some major medical issues that kept her from gardening at all, let alone helping with the stand. I was able to pick up things and still help her family have some of the fresh produce they had now grown used to during the summers.

processing tomatoes for spaghetti sauce dinning room table

Having the produce stand has also resulted in some unintended opportunities.  It has allowed my neighbor-friend to realize another area of need outside of our community that provides better income on a more consistent basis, during the summers, with not a lot of extra effort.  I too have begun noticing other areas of opportunity and have had the confidence to try them.

When this past Spring was approaching I knew I had to say “no” to more things in my life due to new priorities.  It was going to be for a season, but it was still hard to accept. The produce stand had become so second nature I was not sure I could stop. It had become a part of who I was. “My house is the one with the produce stand out front,” was often how I explained to people where I lived. It had also started taking up more of my time and mental energy.

My biggest worry was how to share this with my neighbor-friend. My second thought was for those who had relied on the stand as a source of affordable fresh produce.

When I shared my conclusion with my friend, her reaction was a sense of relief. Not at all the reaction I was expecting.  She too had been trying to figure out the words to use to say that she could not do the produce stand this year.  Her family responsibilities were going to be increasing, taking up more of her time. We both had been worried about letting the other down when in reality it was not the right season for either of us.

large white pumpkin at stand

As Spring turned into Summer I had several people ask about the produce stand. While they were disappointed, I assured them it would be for a season, not permanent.

It was the right decision. As Summer went along, it was very obvious I could not have done it all. I did not want to do it all.  While we missed the extra cash flow, it was not something we were relying upon to make ends meet.

I did not even need it as a source of extra produce to preserve, as that was something else to which I had said “no”. It helped that I had canned a lot of extra the past 2 years, enough to see us through on several different items.

What started out as an act of desperation when I had begun to feel overwhelmed, ended up being a very healthy thing. It allowed me to step back, re-evaluate if this was something I wanted to keep doing, to spend my time on, or something I needed to let someone else take over. (Several other gardeners had begun doing the same thing in the last year or two.)

Farmer's Market Stand

While I see myself picking it back up this coming summer, I also see myself setting boundaries.  We had both begun feeling as if we had to put the stand out, not because we had extra produce but because people expected it to be there. It was becoming more of a burden than a blessing.

Having the extra time this past year has allowed flexibility in deciding what was best for our family at this time.  Even that has changed several times as various needs have come and gone.

While I wish I could say, “This is what is going to happen, this is what is going to work for us in the upcoming 12 (unforseen) months”, I know better.  Forget about His laughing at my presumptions, I would do it for Him.

So, for now, I see that this past year was only “for a season”. Whether my forecast is accurate or not remains to be seen. I now know that I can let go and still be Me, that my identity is tied to more that something I happen to be doing at this time, even if it is something I greatly enjoy doing. This is a lesson I seem to have needed reminding of yet again.

 

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Sep 162015
 

birds eye view of garden june 2015(This post was started in June)

Saying “no” is not easy.  We grow so accustomed to our lives that it feels like there are things we just can not live without, or rather things that would not function if we were not involved.  We can not imagine not doing XYZ, because we have always done it.  Saying “no” means stepping back and taking an honest look at life, yourself and the assumptions you have made.

Things are better now than they were this past Fall/Winter, but they are still tough.  I can feel the stress start to creep in, the feeling of things being on the verge of crumbling in one big mess.  I take a deep breath and remember to just do the next thing, not to try to fix or do everything right now.

I told my MOPS group that I could not volunteer again for the upcoming year.  I loved helping in this group, but knew that my home, my kids, and my true calling came first.  Also, I was much better at getting to know new moms one-on-one, rather than as a leader.  I volunteered on the Steering Committee because I knew that I could do the job, not because it was really where I shine.  It was time for someone else to have the opportunity to step up.

I had to tell Olaf’s parents that I could not continue to watch him over the summer.  This was a bit easier, as they had more options with school being out to find other arrangements.  He still comes over some, but not several times a week.  We’ll see what the new school year brings, but I think I am going to have to continue to say “no” to this one.  With Jack being home school and beginning 1st grade, I am looking to set more of a routine than I did last semester.  Watching another kid for several morning a week really sort of limits what we can do.  This was one “no” that made me really sad, as I was doing it because I knew it was helping out a friend, not because of the money.  Jack and Olaf also get along really well and I know they miss seeing each other.

Unlike the past 8 years, I started no garden plants at home. Zilch. I was trying to keep the house above freezing.  Getting the basement picked up enough to start plants was not exactly high on the list.  I gave myself grace to buy plants this year.  You know what?  I still somehow ended up with:

  • over 10 tomato plants
  • 26 pepper plants
  • 80 onion sets
  • tons of radishes
  • 3 cabbage plants (though I don’t think they will do anything)
  • Zinnias and marigolds
  • several handfuls of green bean plants
  • a zucchini plant
  • 3 unknown vine-ing plants
  • 4 or 5 cucumbers
  • and berry bushes/plants of various varieties.

I will say that I think it worked out okay this year.

school year 2015 2016 collage

Fast forward 3 months and I am in a slightly better place.  There are still a lot of things I have stopped doing, for now, but have picked back up a few.  I am also weighing whether I want to begin doing some things again in a few months when life calms down even more, hopefully.

As it turns out, Olaf does come two half days a week.  He goes to preschool in the mornings, so Jack and I are able to get his school work done before Olaf comes.  Usually.  Sometimes we are finishing as they are walking in the door.

The house remodel/work is nearing completion.  Not fully there, but oh so close.  My husband is finally able to see what I saw in my mind when we started this adventure.  The finishing touches on the drywall should be completed next week.  Then painting, finishing electrical work and install light fixtures, install a small HVAC system for the  new room, flooring, and finally trim and doors.  Yes, I know it is still not an extremely short list, but it is all quick stuff and some can be done simultaneously.

I have continued to say “no” to the produce stand.  A few people have asked me if I was planning to do it, to which I reply, “I have thought it was time to begin it several times lately, but was reminded that it was not time just yet.”  I was doing yard work outside today when someone stopped by looking for a particular item.  I did not have what she was looking for but told her I would see if I could find someone who did.  Seems roma tomatoes were not very popular to plant with gardeners in our are this year.  In talking with her, though, I mentioned I had hot peppers (that were planted to have something in that spot besides weeds) if she wanted them.  I would give them to her just so they could be used and not wasted.  And that, Dear Readers, is the extent of me ‘selling’ produce.

I also have not canned up any items.  There have been several bags of tomato soup added to the freezer, but nothing canned.  Thanks to previous years’ efforts I am still well stocked on most items and should be able to make it through to the next canning year.  I did relent and purchase commercially made spaghetti sauce.  I think pizza sauce will be the next thing I run out of and have to go buy.

There are more areas in life which have been affected by this attitude, the feeling that I have more say in my life.  It is a nice feeling to have when the expectations of others begin to feel more important than what you know is best for your family.  It is a nice feeling to have, to be able to clear things off your plate so you have room to enjoy the what is left.

nature center lounge

When my blog took an unexpected vacation, thanks to an error in a line of code, I was left examining the roll blogging plays in my life.  I felt a loss of the memories I have shared on here these past few years, ones that I have not journaled about.  This blog was begun at a point when taking time to hand write daily events seemed too overwhelming. It also provided a mental break for me, challenging me to keep growing while also being able to share a love of mine.  Was I ready to give it up at the drop of a hat?  Should I give it up?  Why not?  What if I did?  What creative outlet could I use instead, which would be realistic at this time?

These are questions I ask myself from time to time, but never faced with such a high likelihood of it actually happening.  This time, the questions felt very real, not just something out of the air to think through and debate.  I would rather have been thinking through which library books to get for Jack, new methods to help George get the next math step, or any other of the many decisions I could have been doing at that point.  These questions, however uncomfortable I felt thinking through them, had to be examined.  I was not willing to just keep going because that is what I have been doing for the past few years.

The thankfulness and relief I felt when the customer service representative told me the code had been fixed and that all should be back to the way it was, answered for me all the questions I had been asking myself.  It was a much different feeling from the relief I felt when I realized I would not have to be staying up for a few hours several evenings one week canning spaghetti sauce.

As I continue through the next few months, finishing up the work on the house, settling in to a home school routine, and going through daily life I am going to continue evaluating things as they come up.  It is so easy to let little things get added to your plate.  Before you know it, you have no room for the things you really want.

Jul 142015
 

 

produce auction collage

This post in part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

Apparently I need to update the description at the top of the posts about produce auctions to include those in Canada.  Actually, the Elmira Produce Auction in Elmira, ON is the only Canadian produce auction I found.  This does not mean there are not more, only that I have not come across them yet.  :)

Found at 7400 Reid Woods Drive in Elimra, Ontario the Elmira Produce Auction (EPAC) has varying  hours, depending on the time of the season.

Mid-April to June: Tuesdays 9am, Fridays 9am.
Mid-June to the end of September: Mondays 1pm, Wednesdays 9am, Fridays 9am.
End of September to end of October: Tuesdays 9am, Fridays 9am. November: Fridays 9am.
There may even be some winter sales, but I am not for sure on that fact, so you will want to call to check it out.

For more information, their phone number is (519) 669-3884.

A Trip to the Elmira Produce Auction

Elmira produce auction links farmers to retailers

How Mennonites Are Modernizing a Local Food Economy

The Elmira Auction – A win-win producers and sellers of local produce

 

Produce Auctions In Ohio – A sampling of 10 various auctions found across the state

 Gardening, Planning, Selling  Comments Off on Produce Auctions In Ohio – A sampling of 10 various auctions found across the state
Apr 252015
 

produce auction collage

This post in part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

Ohio produce growers and those in search of produce, have several choices of produce auctions to attend.  Rural Action has a map of 9 different produce auctions across Ohio.  There is a new auction (Scioto Valley Produce Auction) that is not on Rural Action’s map, bringing the total to 10 different produce auctions. While the majority are found in the northeast part of the state, there are several found in the southern part as well as on auction in the northwest part of the state.


Chesterhill Produce Auction, in Morgan County is located at 8380 Wagoner Rd, Chesterhill, Ohio, is a example of having the right people in the right place at the right time to fill a need of a community.  The video here explains how and why this auction was started.  They also highlight the benefits to the community and the farmers. Starting in May, on Mondays and Thursdays at 4 p.m, the auction will continue into October.

On a side note, I was really thrilled to see the effort and results put into this auction by those who first thought of idea and those who have joined to make it a success.  It would have been easy to give up and throw in the towel any  number of times along the way.  Instead, perseverance has paid off and now there is a thriving auction in place that benefits all involved.

Here are two more links about the auction in Chesterville :

Chesterhill Produce Auction: A Rural Appalachia Case Study

Chesterhill Produce Auction from Rural Action

 

Bainbridge Produce Auction in Ross County is located 5 miles south of Bainbridge, Ohio 45612 on St. Route 41.  This is in the southwest portion of Ohio, about 1.5 hours east of Cincinnati.  Auctions are held 3 times a week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  For further information call 740-634-3451.

 


Owl Creek Produce Auction, in Marrow County, is located at 20999 Waterford Rd. (St. Rt. 22) Fredricktown, Ohio 43019.  The 2015 Season began in early April.  In May the auctions move to taking place on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Fridays at 9 a.m.  From June through the beginning of October auctions take place 3 times a week.  Check out their website for times.

Ohio’s Country Journal wrote an article in 2014 highlighting the Owl Creek Produce Auction.

Scioto Valley Produce Auction in Hardin County if a fairly new auction, locate a few miles east of Kenton Ohio.  This auction is fairly new, having started in 2011. The auction is located at 18031 State Route 309, Kenton, Ohio 43326.  

The first auction of the 2015 Season was April 17th.  Check their Facebook page for more information on upcoming auction dates and times.

Here is another video featuring the Scioto Valley Produce Auction.

 

Captina Produce Auction is located at  39050 W. Captina Highway, Barnesville, Ohio in Belmont County.  Auctions are held on Tuesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m.  Here is an article from written by the Barnesville-Enterprise that tells a bit more about this auction and what you might find.

 

Mt. Hope Produce Auction in Holmes County is located at 7701 St. Rt. 241 Millersburg, Ohio 44654

From their website: “The Farmer’s Produce Auction was started in 1995 as a wholesale market for local farmers to grow and sell their produce in bulk to buyers throughout the state. The Produce Auction was the first of its kind started in Ohio and is currently one of the largest in the state.”

Looking at their auction schedule, I would have to agree.  They currently are running produce auctions twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays), though say they will be “running Monday @ 11:00 AM, Tuesday, Thursday, and Fridays at 10:00 AM.”  

Here are some further articles, experiences and photos from the Mt. Hope Produce Auction:

Homerville Produce Auction is found in Medina County.  Their address is 9430 Spencer Rd. Homerville, Ohio 44235

To see when their next auction is, check out their Facebook page.

 

Middlefield Produce Auction/Geauge Growers Produce Auction, in Geauge County, is a very action packed  place to be.  Found at 14575 Madison Rd. (St.Rt. 528) Middlefield, Ohio 44062, this auction can have up to 3 different auction rings going at the same time by the high of summer.  Even through the winter they are selling items, though no produce.

The first auction for the 2015 Season was April 6th. Through the month of April Monday auctions are held 5 p.m.  Begining May 1st, 10 a.m. Friday auctions will also be held.  In June, the 10 a.m. Wednesday auctions will be added.

Here is an article from Cleveland.com concerning the Middlefield Produce Auction – Monday Is Auction Day In Middlefield.

Blooming Grove Auction, located at 1091 Free Rd. Shiloh, Ohio 44878 is in Richland County.  To find time of auctions, check here.  A phone number can also be found at the same link, if you are wanting to double check whether an auction is take place at a certain time.

Apr 162015
 

produce auction collage

This post in part of a series about produce auctions across the USA.  While this is not a comprehensive list, I have tried to include auctions about which I can find information.  If you know of any others, feel free to leave a note in the comments section.

Virginia is home to several different produce auctions, though it was hard to find a lot of information for half of these.  What I was able to find were YouTube videos and some basic information.  Sometimes being able to see things in action helps to know what to expect when you get there.

If you have ever been to one of these auctions, I would love to know more details or personal accounts. Feel free to leave a comment or a link to a post of yours in the comment section.

Shenandoah Valley Produce Auction – Auctions begin in April.  For the first part of the season (April – mid July) there are two auctions a week, on Tuesday and Friday at 9:30 a.m.  Starting July 15 and running through September an additional auction is added on Fridays at 12:30 p.m.  In October they go back to just two auctions a week, dropping the Friday auction.  In November, they reduce it further to just one auction a week, Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m.

The website for the Shenandoah Valley Produce Auction contains Market Reports and Directions, as well as links to items for sale and local markets.

Southside Produce Auction near Cullen, Virginia is a relatively new auction, having opened just a few years ago.  They hold auctions on Tuesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m.  According to the comments section from the post Southside Produce Auction – Revisited  by Apricot Farm, it is located at the intersection of Vincent Store Road and Route 47.    Here is another article about the Southside Produce Auction, this time from Country Folks – Virginia’s Southside Produce Auction enters third year.

Virginia Beach Farmers’ Market

3640 Dam Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23453 
Phone: 757.385.4388
Day/Times  
Every Wednesday, June 13-October 31, 2012 
6:30 p.m. Start Time For Bulk Buyers; 7:00 p.m. Start time for Smaller Lots

***The information above was taken from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.  Note the year, 2012.  I called the number to confirm the information, but there was no answering machine and no one answered.  I will try once more to make sure.  Till then, you may want to call and check that the information is correct before heading out to attend.

 

COURTLAND, VIRGINIA

Southeast Virginia Farmers Market/Courtland Farmers’ Market
 24540 Agripark Drive
Courtland, VA 23837
Phone:  757.653.0728
Day/Time
Thursday nights, June 6-October 24, 6:30 p.m. 

***The information above was taken from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.  I called to confirm the information, but was only given the opportunity to leave a message.  No further information was given except that I had reached the market in Courtland.  I will call one more to double check that the information is correct.  Until then, you may want to call ahead to make sure the above information is accurate before heading out to attend.